11272019142553_500x500“Demonstrates the continuing efficacy of an identity-oriented approach to exploring past lives and lifeways via human skeletal remains and their archaeological settings.”—Alexis T. Boutin, coeditor of Remembering the Dead in the Ancient Near East: Recent Contributions from Bioarchaeology and Mortuary Archaeology

“Breaks new ground. This thought-provoking collection of case studies from around the world engages multiple theoretical approaches—and will help focus and drive the next decade of research in this important theme of bioarchaeological research.”—Haagen D. Klaus, coeditor of Bones of Complexity: Bioarchaeological Case Studies of Social Organization and Skeletal Biology

Bioarchaeology and Identity Revisited highlights new directions in the study of social identities in past populations. Building on the field-defining research in Bioarchaeology and Identity in the Americas, contributors expand the scope of the subject regionally, theoretically, and methodologically. This collection moves beyond the previous focus on single aspects of identity by demonstrating multi-scalar approaches and by explicitly addressing intersectionality in the archaeological record.

Case studies in this volume come from both New World and Old World settings, including sites in North America, South America, Asia, and the Middle East. The communities investigated range from early Holocene hunter-gatherers to nineteenth-century urban poor. Contributors broaden the concept of identity to include disability or health status, age, social class, religion, occupation, and communal and familial identities. In addition to combining bioarchaeological data with oral history and material artifacts, they use new methods including social network analysis and more humanistic approaches in osteobiography. Bioarchaeology and Identity Revisited offers updated ways of conceptualizing identity across time and space.
 
Kelly J. Knudson is professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and director of the Center for Bioarchaeological Research at Arizona State University. Christopher M. Stojanowski is professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. They are coeditors of Bioarchaeology and Identity in the Americas.   A volume in the series Bioarchaeological Interpretations of the Human Past: Local, Regional, and Global Perspectives, edited by Clark Spencer Larsen

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