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Today we are highlighting two journals and a book series published by the University of Florida Press: the journals Bioarchaeology International and Forensic Anthropology, and the book series Bioarchaeological Interpretations of the Human Past


BI_4_2_cvrBioarchaeology International

Gwen Robbins Schug and Siân E. Halcrow, Editors-in-Chief

Bioarchaeology International provides rigorous peer-reviewed publication of substantive articles in the growing field of bioarchaeology. This vibrant, interdisciplinary field of study cross-cuts biological anthropology, archaeology, and social theory to situate past peoples within their biological, cultural, and environmental circumstances. Bioarchaeology emphasizes not only the study of human remains but the integrative analysis and interpretation of their context, including the archaeological, socio-cultural and political milieu, and environmental setting. Bioarchaeologists use both state-of-the-art methodological innovation and theory to investigate a diversity of questions.

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Forensic_Anthropology_Journal_RGBForensic Anthropology

Nicholas V. Passalacqua, Editor-in-Chief
Angi M. Christensen, and Joseph T. Hefner, Editors

Forensic Anthropology is a journal devoted to the advancement of the science and professional development of the fields of forensic anthropology and forensic archaeology.

The journal primarily focuses on research, technical advancements, population data, and case studies related to the recovery and analysis of human remains in a forensic context. Topics such as forensic osteology, skeletal biology, and modern human skeletal variation are within the scope of Forensic Anthropology.

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Bioarchaeological Interpretations of the Human Past: Local, Regional, and Global Perspectives

Edited by Clark Spencer Larsen, The Ohio State University

Focusing on bioarchaeology, books in this series highlight central issues, such as biocultural responses to stress, health, lifestyle and behavioral adaptation, biomechanical function and adaptive shifts in human history, dietary reconstruction and foodways, biodistance and population history, warfare and conflict, demography, social inequality, and environmental impacts on population. Collectively, authors and editors emphasize integrative, interdisciplinary analysis of the links between biology and culture in past societies and the range of cultural, social, and economic conditions and circumstances that have shaped the human experience.

 
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Leprosy: Past and Present
Charlotte A. Roberts

Through an unprecedented multidisciplinary and global approach, this book documents the dramatic 7,000-year history of leprosy using bioarchaeological, clinical, and historical information from a wide variety of contexts, dispelling many longstanding myths about the disease.

Bioarchaeology and Identity Revisited
Edited by Kelly J. Knudson and Christopher M. Stojanowski

This volume highlights new directions in the study of social identities in past populations. Contributors expand the scope of the field regionally, methodically, and theoretically, moving behind the previous focus on single aspects of identity by demonstrating multi-scalar approaches and by explicitly addressing intersectionality in the archaeological record.

06112019165038_500x500Bioarchaeology of Frontiers and Borderlands
Edited by Cristina I. Tica and Debra L. Martin

Essays in this volume examine borderland settings in cultural contexts that include Roman Egypt, Iron Age Italy, eleventh-century Iceland, and the precontact American Great Basin and Southwest. Contributors examine how frontier life can affect health and socioeconomic status. Illustrating the many meanings and definitions of frontiers and borderlands, they question assumptions about the relationships between people, place, and identity. 

The Odd, the Unusual, and the Strange: Bioarchaeological Explorations of Atypical Burials
Edited by Tracy K. Betsinger, Amy B. Scott, and Anastasia Tsaliki

Abnormal burial practices have long been a source of fascination and debate within the fields of mortuary archaeology and bioarchaeology. The Odd, the Unusual, and the Strange investigates an unparalleled geographic and temporal range of burials that differ from the usual customs of their broader societies, emphasizing the importance of a holistic, context-driven approach to these intriguing cases.  

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Mortuary and Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Bronze Age Arabia
Edited by Kimberly D. Williams and Lesley A. Gregoricka

This volume brings together experts in archaeology and bioarchaeology to examine continuity and change in ancient Arabian mortuary practices. While most previous investigations have been limited geographically to Egypt and the Levant, this volume focuses on the lesser-studied southeastern Arabian Peninsula, showing what death and burial can reveal about the lifestyles of the region’s prehistoric communities. 

Massacres: Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology Approaches
Edited by Cheryl P. Anderson and Debra L. Martin

This volume integrates data from researchers in bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology to explain when and why group-targeted violence occurs. Massacres have plagued both ancient and modern societies, and by analyzing skeletal remains from these events within their broader cultural and historical contexts this volume opens up important new understandings of the underlying social processes that continue to lead to these tragedies. 

Browse all books in this series

Use code AAPA21 for discount prices and free shipping through June 30, 2021 

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