This year’s NCBS conference is being held virtually. Our virtual booth is open through May 31, 2022 and offers great deals on our Black studies titles. Use code NCBS22 for discount prices and free shipping.

Click Here to View all Titles in Our Virtual Booth

Read on for highlights from this year’s exhibit 


Want to use a UPF book in your course?

To request an exam copy, please complete this form. For more information on course adoption and the discounts we can offer to students, email us at marketing@upress.ufl.edu.


Highlights from Our Virtual Booth
Use code NCBS22 for discounts and free shipping

09142021190229_500x500Bertha Maxwell-Roddey: A Modern-Day Race Woman and the Power of Black Leadership
Sonya Y. Ramsey

This biography of educational activist and Black studies pioneer Bertha Maxwell-Roddey examines a life of remarkable achievements and leadership in the early years of the desegregated South. Sonya Ramsey describes how Maxwell-Roddey and her peers turned hard-won civil rights and feminist milestones into tangible accomplishments in North Carolina and nationwide from the late 1960s to the 1990s.

Publication of this work made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Rooted Jazz Dance: Africanist Aesthetics and Equity in the Twenty-First Century
Edited by Lindsay Guarino, Carlos R.A. Jones, and Wendy Oliver

Decolonizing contemporary jazz dance practice, this book examines the state of jazz dance theory, pedagogy, and choreography in the twenty-first century, recovering and affirming the lifeblood of jazz in Africanist aesthetics and Black American culture.

Publication of this work made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Now Available in Paperback

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NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement
Edited by Brian C. Odom and Stephen P. Waring

Examining the ways in which NASA’s goal of space exploration both conflicted and aligned with the cause of racial equality, this volume provides new insights into the complex relationship between the space program and the civil rights movement in the Jim Crow South and abroad.

Publication of the paperback edition made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Robert R. Church Jr. and the African American Political Struggle
Darius J. Young

This volume highlights the little-known story of Robert R. Church Jr., the most prominent black Republican of the 1920s and 1930s. Tracing Church’s lifelong crusade to make race an important part of the national political conversation, Darius Young reveals how Church was critical to the formative years of the civil rights struggle.

Publication of the paperback edition made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Race, Place, and Memory: Deep Currents in Wilmington, North Carolina
Margaret M. Mulrooney

A revealing work of public history that shows how communities remember their pasts in different ways to fit specific narratives, Race, Place, and Memory charts the ebb and flow of racial tension in Wilmington, North Carolina, from the 1730s to the present day.

Publication of the paperback edition made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Black Well-Being: Health and Selfhood in Antebellum Black Literature
Andrea Stone

Analyzing slave narratives, emigration polemics, a murder trial, and Black-authored fiction, Andrea Stone highlights the central role physical and mental health and well-being played in antebellum Black literary constructions of selfhood. At a time when political and medical theorists emphasized Black well-being in their arguments for or against slavery, African American men and women developed their own theories about what it means to be healthy and well in contexts of injury, illness, sexual abuse, disease, and disability.

Publication of the paperback edition made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Precarious Passages: The Diasporic Imagination in Contemporary Black Anglophone Fiction
Tuire Valkeakari

Precarious Passages unites literature written by members of the far-flung Black Anglophone diaspora. Rather than categorizing novels as simply “African American,” “Black Canadian,” “Black British,” or “postcolonial African Caribbean,” this book takes an integrative approach: it argues that fiction creates and sustains a sense of a wider African diasporic community in the Western world.

Publication of the paperback edition made possible by a Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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The Public Health Nurses of Jim Crow Florida
Christine Ardalan

Highlighting the long unacknowledged role of a group of pioneering professional women, The Public Health Nurses of Jim Crow Florida tells the story of healthcare workers who battled racism in a state where white supremacy formed the bedrock of society. They aimed to serve those people out of reach of modern medical care.

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Pauulu’s Diaspora: Black Internationalism and Environmental Justice
Quito J. Swan

This book is a sweeping story of Black internationalism across the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean worlds, told through the life and work of twentieth-century environmental activist Pauulu Kamarakafego. Quito Swan shows how Kamarakafego helped connect liberation efforts of the African diaspora throughout the Global South.

Open access edition funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities available here.

05202021180503_500x500Hell Without Fires: Slavery, Christianity, and the Antebellum Spiritual Narrative
Yolanda Pierce

Hell Without Fires examines the spiritual and earthly results of conversion to Christianity for African-American antebellum writers. Using autobiographical narratives, the book shows how Black writers transformed the earthly hell of slavery into a “New Jerusalem,” a place they could call home.


Click Here to View all Titles in Our Virtual Booth

Use code NCBS22 for discount prices and free shipping through May 31, 2022.

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