This year’s FAS Conference was held last weekend in Miami. Our virtual booth is open through June 30, 2022 and offers great deals on our Florida anthropology and archaeology books. Use code FAS22 for discount prices and free shipping within the U.S.

Click Here to View All Titles in Our Virtual Booth

Read on for highlights from this year’s exhibit.


Want to use a UPF book in your course?

To request an exam copy, please complete this form. For more information on course adoption and the discounts we can offer to students, email us at marketing@upress.ufl.edu.


Highlights from Our Virtual Booth
Use code FAS22 for discounts and free shipping within the U.S.

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The Nine Lives of Florida’s Famous Key Marco Cat
Austin J. Bell

Florida Book Awards, Bronze Medal for Florida Nonfiction

“An outstanding book on one of North America’s most iconic artifacts. We follow the Cat from its origins as a tree in a forest a few centuries ago to its manufacture and use by Native Americans in Florida to its rediscovery by archaeologists in 1896 and its continuing odyssey.”—Torben C. Rick, curator of North American Archaeology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History


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Presidios of Spanish West Florida
Judith A. Bense

“Using extensive archaeological, historic, and archival data, Bense summarizes and integrates the data collected into a synthesis of how and where Spain first occupied and used the Pensacola area. Relevant for anyone interested in the long-term process of colonization and ethnogenesis. A superb example of how the public can be integrated into a long-term archaeological project, to the benefit of all.”—Lynne Goldstein, professor emerita, Michigan State University


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Methods, Mounds, and Missions
New Contributions to Florida Archaeology

Edited by Ann S. Cordell and Jeffrey M. Mitchem

“A dazzling array of research and ideas inspired by Jerald T. Milanich, doyen of Florida archaeology. Contributions by leading scholars on Weeden Island and later cultures, European contact archaeology, the Glades area, and Seminole archaeology mean this important book will find a home on every Florida archaeologist’s bookshelf.”—Ryan Wheeler, coeditor of Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida’s Watery Realms


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Unearthing the Missions of Spanish Florida
Edited by Tanya M. Peres and Rochelle A. Marrinan

“This long-awaited volume is a compelling look at a period of history unknown to many. It is a must-have for anyone interested in the scholarship of the Spanish mission period in Florida.”—Charles R. Ewen, coeditor of Pieces of Eight: More Archaeology of Piracy


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New Methods and Theories for Analyzing Mississippian Imagery
Edited by Bretton T. Giles and Shawn P. Lambert

“In chapters ranging from the Georgia coast to the Caddo area, readers will engage with detailed analyses of motifs and designs, move back and forth between archaeological artifacts and Native American narratives, and gain new perspectives about the use and meanings of objects.”—Mary Beth Trubitt, University of Arkansas


05182021190825_500x500Archaeologies of Indigenous Presence
Edited by Tsim D. Schneider and Lee M. Panich

“A perfect embodiment of the major transformations occurring in North American archaeology today. The wide representation of Native American voices in this volume may be unequaled anywhere in the archaeological literature. The authors advocate methods, concepts, and terminologies to unerase practices of erasure.”—Charles R. Cobb, author of The Archaeology of Southeastern Native American Landscapes of the Colonial Era


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Under the Shade of Thipaak
The Ethnoecology of Cycads in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean
Edited by Michael D. Carrasco, Angélica Cibrián-Jaramillo, Mark A. Bonta, and Joshua D. Englehardt  

“This groundbreaking volume takes the cycad-human relationship out of the scholarly shadows. It will serve as the primary source for the importance of the Cycadales order in past, present, and future human societies.”—Dolores R. Piperno, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute


Now Available in Paperback


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Taíno Indian Myth and Practice

The Arrival of the Stranger King
William F. Keegan

“An excellent example of how oral traditions (mythology), historical sources, and archaeology can work together to provide richer, more complex views of the human past.”—Choice  

“An open-minded combination of archaeology, ethnohistory, and cultural anthropology.” —Latin American Antiquity  

“Explores the intersection of myths, beliefs and practices among the different participants who have written this history.”—Times of the Islands


10312018135804_500x500Archaeologies of Listening
Edited by Peter R. Schmidt and Alice B. Kehoe

Open Access PDF Available Here

“Emphasizes the value of respectful engagement with local communities and the rewards that are to be reaped in return for patience and humility.”—Antiquity  

“A critical and diverse range of essays. . . . This volume invites researchers to learn to listen, to rethink their scholarship and relationship with local communities, and to strike a pragmatic balance between scientifically sound investigations while being sensitive to the views of the living.”—African Archaeological Review


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What Your Fossils Can Tell You
Vertebrate Morphology, Pathology, and Cultural Modification
Robert W. Sinibaldi

“Explaining the subtle details and more, and outlined with an abundance of black and white photographs and charts, What Your Fossils Can Tell You is a fine text for both would be professionals and enthusiastic non-specialist general readers.”—The Midwest Book Review

“An eclectic book that will appeal to amateur fossil collectors, especially those who specialize in vertebrate materials”—American Reference Books Annual


Click Here to View all Titles in Our Virtual Booth

Use code FAS22 for discount prices and free shipping through June 30, 2022.

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