The Making of Mississippian Tradition

“A significant and important study of the interactions and influences of Cahokia with its northern neighbors, featuring the most comprehensive available description of the regionally significant Audrey site in the Lower Illinois Valley.”—Lynne P. Sullivan, coeditor of Mississippian Women “An interesting and well-written volume that provides much-needed information on the varied ways that hinterland communities adapted … Continue reading The Making of Mississippian Tradition

Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

“An important volume that will become an indispensable resource, providing a much-needed update on early contact in the North American Southeast with a rich emphasis on the agency and social lives of past indigenous communities.”—David H. Dye, editor of New Deal Archaeology in Tennessee: Intellectual, Methodological, and Theoretical Contributions The years AD 1500–1700 were a time … Continue reading Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

Cahokia in Context

“Impressive. Provides perspective on the interconnectedness of Cahokia with regional cultures, the evidence for (or against) this connection in specific areas, and the hows and whys of Cahokian influence on shaping regional cultures. There is no other comparable work.”—Lynne P. Sullivan, coeditor of Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective “This volume synthesizes information … Continue reading Cahokia in Context

Authority, Autonomy, and the Archaeology of a Mississippian Community

“This excellent book is an imaginative and innovative consideration of the history and materiality of monumental architecture and community at Parchman Place. Essential reading for scholars and students of the archaeology of the Mississippian Southeast.”—Christopher B. Rodning, coeditor of Fort San Juan and the Limits of Empire: Colonialism and Household Practice at the Berry Site “This … Continue reading Authority, Autonomy, and the Archaeology of a Mississippian Community