The Evidence for Insect Eating in Human Evolution

Written by Julie J. Lesnik, author of Edible Insects and Human Evolution   Unlike the archaeological record for meat eating, which contains evidence from numerous sites of butchered bones with marks left by stone tools, the evidence for insect eating is scarce. However, this does not mean that insects were not an important part of … Continue reading The Evidence for Insect Eating in Human Evolution

Edible Insects and Human Evolution

"An original and satisfying synthesis on the evolution of the human diet that draws from all the relevant fields of the natural and social sciences."—W. C. McGrew, author of The Cultured Chimpanzee: Reflections on Cultural Primatology   "Engaging. Argues most convincingly that insects were an important food source during human evolution."—Margaret J. Schoeninger, University of California … Continue reading Edible Insects and Human Evolution

Transnational Hispaniola

"Highly original and richly researched, this volume challenges many of the bedrock assumptions in Dominican and Haitian nationalist and statist thought, filling important gaps in the literature on the island in English."—Lauren Derby, coeditor of Activating the Past: History and Memory in the Black Atlantic World "This inspiring collection offers a new way of seeing the … Continue reading Transnational Hispaniola

Reconsidering Southern Labor History

"This collection impresses with its chronological sweep, diverse subject matter, and fresh perspectives on southern labor history. It not only affirms the relevance of the southern working-class experience but also enhances our understanding of the broader contours of labor and working-class history."—Robert Bussel, author of Fighting for Total Person Unionism: Harold Gibbons, Ernest Calloway, and Working-Class … Continue reading Reconsidering Southern Labor History

A Lost Princess Remembered in Senegal

Written by Daniel L. Schafer, author of Anna Madgigine Jai Kingsley: African Princess, Florida Slave, Plantation Slaveowner, Revised and Expanded Edition   In 1806, at the public market in Rufisque, a coastal fishing village in Senegal, West Africa, a thirteen-year-old girl named Anta Madjiguène Ndiaye was sold as a slave to merchants from nearby Gorée … Continue reading A Lost Princess Remembered in Senegal